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  • Sammy Melnick

Reducing and Reusing Basics


The most effective way to reduce waste is to not create it in the first place. Making a new product requires a lot of materials and energy - raw materials must be extracted from the earth, and the product must be fabricated then transported to wherever it will be sold. As a result, reduction and reuse are the most effective ways you can save natural resources, protect the environment and save money.


Ideas on How to Reduce and Reuse


Buy used. You can find everything from clothes to building materials at specialized reuse centers and consignment shops. Often, used items are less expensive and just as good as new.

Look for products that use less packaging. When manufacturers make their products with less packaging, they use less raw material. This reduces waste and costs. These extra savings can be passed along to the consumer.

Buying in bulk, for example, can reduce packaging and save money.Buy reusable over disposable items.

Look for items that can be reused; the little things can add up. For example, you can bring your own silverware and cup to work, rather than using disposable items.

Maintain and repair products, like clothing, tires and appliances, so that they won't have to be thrown out and replaced as frequently.

Borrow, rent or share items that are used infrequently, like party decorations, tools or furniture.

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ABOUT US >

Planet First Foundation is an environmental nonprofit  charity that is committed to reducing reliance on single-use plastics in increasing recycling to reduce our footprint.

Founded in the United States in 2019 by Samuel Melnick, Planet First Foundation is focused on becoming one of the most effective organizations targeting a reduction of the excess creation of non-recyclable waste.  Scientists have long recognized that plastics biodegrade slowly, if at all, and pose multiple threats to wildlife on land and in oceans through entanglement and consumption.  More recent reports highlight dangers posed by absorption of toxic chemicals in the water and by plastic odors that mimic some species’ natural food.

 

Our task is not an easy one ... Between 1989 and 1994 the beverage industry spent $14 million to defeat the National Bottle Bill.  But plastic ends up buried underneath tons of trash.  Its harmful toxic chemicals  leach into the ground and into groundwater potentially contaminating drinking water supplies, rivers, streams, and eventually the ocean.

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